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ARTICLE
When is a Gig Not a Gig?
Do you DJ at weddings? If so, do you refer to these bookings as ‘gigs’? And, if your answer was ‘yes’, do you refer to them as ‘gigs’ when speaking to wedding couples?

Allow me to generalise for a moment and say that, from my experience, DJs fall into two distinct camps. Firstly there are those under 30 who are often club DJs and may also take on mobile bookings. Then there are those over 40 who are more likely to be mobile DJs for whom a lot of their work is at weddings. Of course, this leaves a gap: those DJs in their 30s, which is when the metamorphosis occurs! …Or was that just me?


THE WEDDING COUPLE ARE THE STARS

When would you say is the age that most people mature? And would you say that this age is any different for most DJs?

I’d say that the point at which a DJ reaches maturity is often around the same time that they stop referring to the weddings at which they perform as ‘gigs’. A wedding is a very special day and it's my belief that once this is properly understood it gives the DJ a different perspective. They realise that, unlike DJing at a club or bar, a wedding is not about them but it's ALL about the couple. This means that everything possible should be done to ensure that the bride and groom are the stars of the show and the DJ should not seek the spotlight, especially if performing during the day.


CONTROLLING THE EGO

For many DJs that start in their teens and 20s their ego is prominent. That comment isn't meant as a criticism of younger DJs, as I was no different at that age, and of course there are always exceptions to every generalisation.

For club work a bit of ego can be a good thing (unless it's out of control and then it can be destructive) and to a certain extent the same is true for mobile work; self-confidence is important for any host. However, this ego must be kept well in check for wedding bookings, ensuring the spotlight is focussed solely on the bride and groom. For those DJs that make the switch from club work to weddings this can be difficult at first.

A problem with ego is that it can prevent many from seeing deficiencies within themselves. This can lead to DJs believing that they rock every gig – which in some ways might be true – but what they usually aren't able to see is that there are things that could be improved to make them even better.
Pro Mobile equipment reviews are sponsored by insure4music.

The full review can be found in Pro Mobile Issue 76, Pages 40 - 41.
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